Purplebricks says its system does allow for offers after a property is ‘sold’

Purplebricks has said that it passes on all offers to vendors, including those made after a property is listed as sold subject to contract.

The firm’s assurance comes after a review was posted online by a seller, claiming: “Once a valuation is agreed and one person agrees to buy at that it is considered sold.”

The review, on Trustpilot, said that all other viewings were cancelled, and that the system “does not allow a higher bid to be put in”.

It suggested that the buyer could then make money from a re-sale, and concluded: “Someone is going to make money from this and it is not the sellers.”

The review was then followed up by an agent who emailed Purplebricks, via Rightmove, about a property which had only just come on the market but was displayed as SSTC just days later.

The agent’s email said he wanted to view the property and that he would pay over the asking price.

However, he says his email was simply answered with an automated email headed “Sorry – this property is now Sold (subject to contract)”. (https://www.purplebricks.com/bookviewing?propertyId=201596&enquiryId=4771540)

The agent claimed that the only way he could contact the vendor was to go round and knock on the door.

He also queried whether this was at odds with an estate agent’s duty to pass on all offers.

We put the case to Purplebricks, and a spokesperson told us: “Everyone can make an offer though Purplebricks at any time 24 hours a day.

“In the event that an offer has been accepted, the customer decides whether they want to continue to market the property or have it marked as sold subject to contract.

“If the property remains on the market, offers are made in the usual way.

“If it is taken off the market, the property is marked sold subject to contract and offers may still be made at any time by speaking to our Central Property Team who are available 24 hours a day.

“All offers are communicated to our customers verbally and in writing, in accordance with the Estate Agents Act 1979.”

55 Comments

  1. Chris Wood

    Once a property is under offer/ sstc, it MUST be advertised as such under CPR. All agents MUST also continue to submit offers whether it is sstc or otherwise. And these people are run by a former solicitor and call themselves “property experts”?!

    How many millions of pounds have consumers potentially lost by these actions?

    “Why can’t I keep my house marked as for sale now I’ve accepted an offer?” https://pzwoody.wordpress.com/2013/12/30/why-cant-i-keep-my-home-marked-as-for-sale/

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  2. AgentPink92

    Hi Chris,

    Your blog is a credit to you both in its content and grammatical style.

    I will be reading it from front to back over the next week or two!

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    1. Chris Wood

      Thank you. I hope you enjoy what you find there.

      Report (0)(1)
  3. Trevor Gillham

    When I wrote our system I allowed for everything to be considered, even when a property is UNDER OFFER or SOLD STC viewings can still be entered as well as offers, in my previous business we had so many properties fall through that we needed backups for our vendors. We always left it to the vendors discretion how they wanted to proceed, worked well.

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  4. Essjaydee51

    Am I reading correctly that you keep marketing once a property is under offer! I accept that until we see action costing the buyer money that we should but I find it immoral to smile at the buyers face whilst happily entertaining all comers to outbid them, no wonder we have a bad name, there must come a time when you feel the house is under offer and be removed as such and at that time a client must be advised of the potential problems of not doing so, surely peeps.

    quite honestly you can sod quoting guide lines of the estate agents act and use your own common sense and decency and hopefully some due care, attention and respect to the buyer,

    Report (3)(12)
    1. PeeBee

      Essjaydee51

      “quite honestly you can sod quoting guide lines of the estate agents act and use your own common sense and decency…”

      I’ll avidly watch for the day that ‘defence’ is tested out in Court.  I’m all for common sense and decency – but most Laws ignore both to the extreme.

      In the meantime, EAA 1979 is what I signed up to when I joined the profession.  You too.
      “…and hopefully some due care, attention and respect to the buyer,”

      They’ll get respect by the bucketload from me – and any decent Agent worth their salt.  They’ll get plentiful due care and attention as part of that – but the Law states that your responsibilities are to the vendor.

      You can’t change or ignore what is your primary role because you want everyone to love you.

      Oh, hang on… where have I seen something to the contrary?

      Oh yeah – top of a certain purple page…

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      1. cyberduck46

        I have been put off by more than one agent when phoning up about properties that are under offer.
         
         
        I have never made an offer and if it is just offers that have to be put forward to the seller then saying you want to view and will offer is not the same as making an offer.
         
        So what does the law say exactly?

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        1. PeeBee

          “I have been put off by more than one agent when phoning up about properties that are under offer.”

          And the reason you are phoning up about properties that clearly someone else has had an offer accepted on it are…?

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          1. cyberduck46

            Just an enquiry to see what the situation was. Like I say I was given no encouragement to make an offer whatsoever.

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            1. PeeBee

              “Just an enquiry to see what the situation was.”

              The clue is in the words “Offer” and Under”.

              We Agents don’t usually need to draw bigger or more detailed pictures than that for most people.

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    2. Eric Walker

      The Law is express. Once an offer is accepted you must seek your vendors written instruction regarding confirmation of further marketing. They can keep the property on the market should they wish and you are obliged to advise the buyer accordingly. Nevertheless, any other interested parties must be informed that an offer have been accepted (regardless of what Asset Managment companies may insist upon) 
      Alternatively, they can remove the property from the market whilst the sale is proceeding, however you remain under a legal obligation to pass on any offers untel instructed not to do so in writing. 
      TPOS Code:
      Continuation of Marketing
      9d When an offer has been accepted subject to contract you must take and confirm the seller’s instructions as to whether the property should be withdrawn from the market, or continue to be marketed. In the latter case, you must so advise the buyer in writing. The buyer must also be informed in writing should the seller later decide to put the property back on the market. You remain under the legal obligation to pass on offers, as defined in 9a above.
      9e You must keep all buyers who have recently made offers through you, and which have not already been rejected, informed of the existence of other offers you have submitted to the seller.
      9f You must be fair and not misleading when disclosing the amount of any offers made to other buyers. Before disclosing the amount of an offer, you must advise the seller of such intention and get the seller’s agreement; and you must warn all buyers who make offers that it is your practice to do so. If you do disclose any offer to one buyer, then all offers must be immediately disclosed to all buyers with a current interest in negotiations for the property.
      9g After an offer has been accepted subject to contract, you must promptly tell that buyer if the seller accepts another offer. 

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      1. cyberduck46

        OK, then in the case discussed above there is no breach of the law because an offer has not been forthcoming.

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        1. PeeBee

          “OK, then in the case discussed above there is no breach of the law because an offer has not been forthcoming.”

          As is pretty clearly stated, an offer had “not  been forthcoming” becase no offer COULD be made.

          Your ‘zeros and ones’ simply did not compute.  Computer said no – because some programmer told it to – and subsequently no-one apparently has done anything to attempt to correct that programming error despite clearly being aware of it.

          Oh, dear.

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        2. Chris Wood

          In law, the potential purchaser has been estopped from making an offer causing the owner potentially very significant loss. The act of preventing an offer being made is therefore a breach of the law. Your fingers may be inserted very deeply into your ear canals cyberduck but you need to keep shouting lalalalala louder, the evidence is mounting up.

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          1. cyberduck46

            Chris, I think you need to look at the legal definition of estoppel. Perhaps brush up on your understanding of the law. Have a quick look on wikipedia, they have some examples.
             
            Estoppel is when you have failed to assert a right and then later try and enforce. Courts can then go on to determine that you are estopped from enforcement.
             
            You aren’t even slightly close with that allegation.
             
            How is an offer being prevented from being made? PurpleBricks have said they will pass any offer on and my chat with them confirms this.
             
            Do you not think the article would have said that PurpleBricks were acting illegally if they were?
             
             
             

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    3. Mark Walker

      Grrrrrr, “so-called-experts”.  Grrrrrrrr.

      Essjaydee51 have you considered going to work north of the border?

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    4. Trevor Mealham

      @ Essjaydee51
      As an agent you work for your clients. All offers HAVE to be put forward unless your clients instruct you otherwise.ie a vendor could put in writing – Only offers over £X’s need be submitted. Only then can an agent not forward any offer.Even post sstc, all offers (unless specific written instructions from your client state otherwise) have to be put forward.
      It’s very worrying that you see favour of a non client buyer, over gaining the best possible outcome for your clients. Its also against the 79 Estate Agents Act for which you can’t make up different rules to trade under than the industry lays down.The big changes that came in was ‘omissions’ to protect consumer buyers from not being told things and CPR’s. CPR’s protect client sellers too.BPR’s give businesses fair play when engaging or dealing with agents.How many vendors would instruct you if they heard you only did wht you thought was best over the way the law says clients should fairly be treated. Agents market and negotiate. Final choice is with the client selling. 
       

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    5. Chris Wood

      Just how long have you been breaking the law and disadvantaging your clients?

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  5. Richard Copus

    It is very worrying the lack of legal knowledge in our industry about dealing with properties that are under offer but not sold.

    The Common Law, not CPRs, is quite clear that a property must be offered for sale until it is sold and sold means exchange of contracts.  There is case law where agents have been prosecuted for not doing so.  However, statute law overides common law and CPRs make it clear that all information must be passed on to would-be buyers where the omission of such information would affect their transactional decision.  Not saying that a property is under offer/sale agreed would clearly do so.

    Therefore a good agent should explain that a sale has been agreed to further interested parties (which puts most of them off) but should inform the client of the additional interest and should not tell the interested party that they cannot view.

    Not exactly rocket science and creates no problems at all most of the time with good communication and transparency.

     

    Richard

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    1. Trevor Mealham

      @ Richard Copus 
      Correct

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  6. Typhoon

    Is it not overdue for the many bodies with their codes we have to work under NFOPP, Property Ombudsman, OFT etc to look into these allegations very carefully. If true the public are being massively disadvantaged financially. I have had many stories of similar failures with PB recounted. Smoke doesn’t usually appear unless there is at least an ember of a fire.

    And if Rightmove and Zoopla had any conscience whilst sitting on their high and mighty moral high ground about “providing the best for the consumer”, they should investigate these allegations deeply and ban any business failing to play by the rules,codes and the law, to protect the consumer from such shocking practices.

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    1. Trevor Mealham

      Sadly, too many in the industry ignore consultations Typhoon.Consultations offer opportunity to highlight to Treasury, HMRC and NTSEAT/Trading Standards, CMA and BIS flaws and improvements.Onwards its up to agents to work within the frameworks the best way they can.Redress schemes can only advise on consumer and agent issues as they re regulators and not legislators. Additionally they can ban redress membership, which carries over to an agent not being able to join the other two redress schemes, meaning an agent would have to stop trading for x years.
      Portals should have to come under closer scrutiny as they currently sit outside agency laws, yet really are the biggest (sub) agents in the UK as agents pay a sub-scription for buyer and tenant introductions, rather than a sub-commission.

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  7. Beano

    Simply put the client is in control, the law protects them. On agreeing a sale we as agents have to ask them ‘do you wish to keep the property on the market whilst the sale goes through – these are the pro’s and these are the con’s’.

    We take their instruction and adhere to the laws as stated. ie, even though its not marketed if another offer comes in – perhaps from a previous viewing – you have to put it forward – as most surely know inside out. Whats so hard about this.

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  8. cyberduck46

    If you look a little deeper you can see that the agent in the “story” above is being somewhat disingenuous because in fact the automated reply from PurpleBricks provides him with a phone number to phone up as well as a link to the online platform. The online platform will tell him he can’t book an appointment because it is sold STC but there’s no reason why he couldn’t have phoned up if his interest had been genuine.

     

    This type of behaviour really doesn’t do your industry any favours. Desperately trying to pick holes in anything you can think of in relation to PurpleBricks. To be honest, it’s pathetic.

     

     

    I wonder what responses I’d get if I sent email offers of £1 off via Rightmove to a sample of let’s say 100 Estate Agents on properties with a ‘Sold STC’ status? I won’t bother because unlike the agent in question I’ve got better things to do with my time.

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    1. Chris Wood

      If ‘pathetic’ is highlighting misleading consumers (see ASA rulings) and asking reasonable questions about a PLC as to whether potential breaches of the 1979 Estate Agents Act, Consumer Protection Regulations Act, HMRC money Laundering regulations, Data Protection regulations etc have taken place, then, I stand guilty as charged.

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      1. cyberduck46

        Chris,
         
        When you refer to misleading consumers would you think that telling them that using cheap agents is costing them around half a billion pounds a year would fall into that bracket?
         
         

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        1. Chris Wood

          Not if that is the case, no. Do you?

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          1. cyberduck46

            >Not if that is the case, no. Do you?
             
            You are misleasding consumers. The cost of half a billion is based on 1.2m transactions being carried out by the cheap agents and a conversion rate of 30%.
             
            Are you standing by those figures? 
             
            You seem to think that anybody who makes a claim has to prove that claim. So go on, prove it. Also your claim that circa. 80% of your listings convert to completions. Please prove that too.
             
            Please confirm you will do this and I will send you my contact details.

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  9. cyberduck46

    My property is currently listed with PurpleBricks and I quite often use their live chat which is excellent because it provides you with a transcript after the chat. PurpleBricks have always given a good response to my questions and I recommend that before believing all these stories people do their own research.

    Below is a chat I had a little earlier:

     
    General Info
    Chat Start Time:20/04/2017 15:41:24

    Chat Transcript
    15:41:26 [Tom] Welcome to Purplebricks. My name is Tom, may I take your name please?
    15:41:38 [Visitor] Hi Tom, my name is John
    15:42:48 [Tom] Good afternoon John, how can I help you today?
    15:43:04 [Visitor] I was wondering whether it is possible to book a viewing for a property that is sold subject to contract.
    15:44:37 [Tom] We wouldn’t be able to book a viewing for a property that is Sold STC as they have already agreed on a buyer. If you would like me to I can take your details and pass them to the agent to see if we can contact you if there is an issue with the sale.
    15:46:13 [Visitor] My property is currently Sold STC and I’m wondering what would happen if somebody else wanted to make an offer.
    15:51:18 [Tom] They wouldn’t be able to place an offer on the system but if they wanted to still make an offer they are able to put an offer forward to us and we would pass it on for you so that you are made aware.
    15:53:11 [Visitor] So am I not allowed to keep the property on the market just in case the current offer falls through?
    15:59:13 [Tom] Once the property becomes Sold STC we will still advertise this on the website as sold stc and we have quite a large amount of queries about these properties. We would then email the agent or set them up for alerts so that is the property did return to the market they would be emailed with the details.
     
    15:59:55 [Visitor] Many thanks. I’ll disconnect now.

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    1. Chris Wood

      Most reasonable people would take a message saying nothing more than “Sorry – this property is now Sold (subject to contract)” as described in this article would give most people the impression that no further offers can be made and appears to make it difficult/ impossible for further offers to be made. 
      “In the event that an offer has been accepted, the customer decides whether they want to continue to market the property or have it marked as sold subject to contract.” The customer has no option, the property must be marketed as sstc. This is a basic legal requirement under CPR. Surprised PB are admitting this in print, on the record.
      “If the property remains on the market, offers are made in the usual way.” Which implies if the property is removed from the market, they are not.
      The link in question no longer exists (very recently taken down) and your call was to PB AFTER this story appeared on PIE. Go figure.

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      1. PeeBee

        Chris

        You may not have spotted this quote from cyberduck46 on the comment thread to this article – http://www.propertyindustryeye.com/gloom-and-doom-survey-from-rics-prompts-misery-fest-among-headline-writers/ – which I raised two days ago and which, I suggested, says it all in respect on his personal stance on the matter of CPRs 2008 etc:

        “You can point to as many consumer protection laws as you want but in the end the consumer will get what they want…”

        He went on to make the statement that “…Estate Agents disingenuously try and invoke consumer protection laws to protect themselves…”

        Protecting ourselves from what exactly I’m not actually sure – but it must be pretty darn dastardly that we have to hide behind the letter of the Law in an apparent disingenious manner to feel protected from it. 

        I’m actually amazed that you can potentially use the Law disingeniously – isn’t that like the ultimate oxymoron? 

        Not for one second suggesting that I’m an expert on oxymorons, of course – merely an observation…

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        1. cyberduck46

          PeeBee,
           
          The point you are missing is that law is defined in statute but then it is up to Judges to interpret that statute. Interpretation of statute by Judges, itself creates law called common law derived from individual cases known as authorities. An authority is only binding if the case was in a superior court and the facts of the case are very similar.
           
          So law is all about interpretation and that is what I mean when I say that in the end the consumer will get what they want. Trading Standards and if it ever comes to it the Courts, will interpret the law to the benefit of the general public in my opinion.
           
          I’ve seen this all before with companies like Google, eBay etc. Those who were losing out to Google, eBay etc. were outraged (on behalf of the consumer, who wasn’t actually outraged 🙂  – sound familiar? ) and claimed a lot of what they were doing in the early days was against the law. End result – law has evolved.
           
           
           

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          1. PeeBee

            “…in my opinion.”

            An opinion to which you have a legal right – countless people fought and died for the right for you to enjoy that legal right.

            However, that right is the ONLY thing that carries any legal weight with what you opine.

            In my opinion, that is…

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      2. cyberduck46

        Chris,
         
        >The customer has no option, the property must be marketed as sstc. This is a basic legal requirement under CPR. Surprised PB are admitting this in print, on the record.
         
        You are wrong. The property doesn’t have to be marketed. See Eric Walker’s post above: “Once an offer is accepted you must seek your vendors written instruction regarding confirmation of further marketing.”
         
        This is exactly what happens with the PurpleBricks system. You can leave it on the market or take it off.
         
        >“If the property remains on the market, offers are made in the usual way.” Which implies if the property is removed from the market, they are not.
         
        Again, wrong conclusion because you are unaware of 1) the law and 2) the way PB do things.
         
        And you charge $500 an hour consultancy.
         
         

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        1. Chris Wood

          I suggest you read my blogpost (link above) on “why can’t my home be marked as for sale?” It was a cross referenced piece with the ASA, NTSEAT and Ombudsman scheme.
          I’m happy to stand by my story. Please don’t expect too many/ any more responses from me.

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    2. Chris Wood

      Cyberduck. I understand you tried to enquire about making an offer whilst I was out of the office this morning. I also understand that my colleague left the exact response on your answer machine that I would expect any professional agent to give; that he would be happy to discuss the property with you and pass on any offers you may wish to make. Have a good evening.

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    3. PeeBee

      “We wouldn’t be able to book a viewing for a property that is Sold STC as they have already agreed on a buyer.”

      Game… set…match.  You’ve just thrown the game.

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      1. cyberduck46

        Not if you read the whole response instead of cherrypicking single statements out of context. You can’t book a viewing on the system but they will pass on any offer you make. Exactly in complience with the law.

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        1. PeeBee

          “You can’t book a viewing on the system but they will pass on any offer you make.”

          SO… what you are saying is that you are required to either make an offer on a property without viewing it or can’t make an offer.

          “Exactly in complience with the law.”

          REALLY?

          An Agent must take all reasonable steps to qualify an offer on behalf of their client.  How can you qualify intent to purchase when the person making the offer hasn’t even crossed the thresh of the property?  How many normal people would offer on a property that will be their future home without seeing it… touching it… feeling it…?

          How many of those ‘offers’, if accepted, would be withdrawn when they finally do get their elusive, woefully late, look at what they have made the loosest commitment in the known world to buy?

          According to some sources, currently some one in 3 ‘sales’ fall through pre-exchange. Care to have a stab at what percentage this would rise to using the cockamamie scenario you and your “Agent” seem to favour? 

          Keep them coming, cyberduck46 – this is exactly the ‘Fish in a barrel 101’ stuff I thrive on!

          Advantage PeeBee… new b@lls, please!

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          1. cyberduck46

            >An Agent must take all reasonable steps to qualify an offer on behalf of their client
             
            That’s not a problem. We are talking about qualifying the offer so reasonable steps would just be to check funding and the chain if there is one. 
             
            In terms of which interpretation is better, yours or Purplebricks, I’m not sure. They both have advantages/disadvantages. I must admit I’m all for people sticking to their agreements so moraly speaking as long as there’s no standout argument why their interpretation is worse then I have no issues with what they are doing.
             
            If Agents didn’t think the best interpretation is to put off new viewings/offers then why do they do it?
             
            Also, I know that many believe the Scottish system is better than ours because it discourages accepting new offers. The property has to come off the market and the surveyor is no longer allowed to represent the seller if they don’t proceed with an agreed offer. 
             
            So the Scottish lawmakers also believe in stopping offers once an agreement is in place.
             
             
             
             
             
             

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            1. PeeBee

              “>An Agent must take all reasonable steps to qualify an offer on behalf of their client …  That’s not a problem.”

              REALLY?? 

              In my opinion, (and, I would hope, that of many in the industry) THE most important ‘reasonable step’ taken to establish a buyer’s offer on a property would be that they actually viewed the chuffin’ thing pre-offering on it.

              Other than investors, who may often take a punt on a ‘bargain buy’ (and in some instances they have no other choice when a property is marketed in ‘unviewable condition’ for whatever reason), although I can recall maybe a handful of cases where an offer has been received on a property based upon whatever limited information was available online or through traditional marketing means, I cannot think of one single example where the vendor took that offer with anything other than a large pinch of salt.

              I wouldn’t like to guess at the number of potential issues that could materialise following acceptance of a ‘blind’ offer that almost certainly wouldn’t, had the purchaser physically visited the property beforehand.  

              I seriously question whether any ‘normal’ buyer would be prepared to offer on a property unseen, and stand by my previous comment in that respect.

              “Also, I know that many believe the Scottish system is better than ours…”

              It matters not one jot what you, I, or anyone else thinks or believes about “the Scottish system”.  We do not work to Scottish Property Laws.

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              1. cyberduck46

                >In my opinion, (and, I would hope, that of many in the industry) THE most important ‘reasonable step’ taken to establish a buyer’s offer on a property would be that they actually viewed the chuffin’ thing pre-offering on it.
                 
                Yes but you are still acting reasonably in the circumstances and have to put the offer forward. I think you are reading too much into the law on the lengths you have to go to to qualify an offer. I believe the law only applies once you’ve had an offer.
                 
                >It matters not one jot what you, I, or anyone else thinks or believes about “the Scottish system”.  We do not work to Scottish Property Laws.
                 
                No, but an agent who works to the law in England but implements it in a way that is closer to the ideal is better do you not think? 
                 
                I take it from the fact you haven’t said whether you think PB are acting legallly or not that you are either not sure or think they are but don’t want to say it.

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                1. PeeBee

                  “No, but an agent who works to the law in England but implements it in a way that is closer to the ideal is better do you not think?”

                  For crying out loud – how can someone “work to the Law”, but implement it in a way that does not fully comply with said Law?

                  Ridiculous.  Utterly ridiculous.

                  “I take it from the fact you haven’t said whether you think PB are acting legallly or not that you are either not sure or think they are but don’t want to say it.”

                  You can ‘take it’ anyway you like.  Be my guest. 

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                  1. cyberduck46

                    PeeBee,
                     
                    I’m saying what PurpleBricks are doing is complying fully with the law in England. Their implementation will reduce the amount of gazumping.
                     
                    They comply with the law by passing on offers and they comply with the law by taking reasonable steps once they’ve had an offer.
                     
                    They are correctly interpreting the law in regard to vetting offers to be just that vetting an offer once they’ve had it.
                     
                    Is there any other law that you haven’t brought into the discussion? If not then it’s very clear to me that you are wrong if you think PurpleBricks are breaking the law in respect of what has been discussed here.
                     
                    Do you really think PurplrBricks’ lawyers didn’t check out their system?

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                    1. PeeBee

                       “Their implementation will reduce the amount of gazumping.”
                      Sir – what are you referring to by the word “gazumping”?

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                    2. cyberduck46

                      gazumping- make a higher offer for a house than (someone whose offer has already been accepted by the seller) and thus succeed in acquiring the property.

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                    3. PeeBee

                      Nice cut’n’paste “definition” there.  Wiki is a wonderful thing full of whatever people want to post there.
                      Now – what’s the Legal definition of the word “gazumping”?
                       

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  10. Chris Wood

    This was the screenshot of the post before Purplebricks took it down for whatever reason after this story broke.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3oqJKVfbDXJZXppdk9Qa0hKb00/view?usp=sharing

     

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    1. cyberduck46

      Exactly, but what the agent doesn’t show is that when he used Rightmove to request the viewing, in the email reply you get a telephone number as well as the link to that page. He’s being disingenuous by not showing the email reply and just showing that link. If he had a genuine interest he would have phoned yet he decided to make it look as though he’d hit a dead end.
       
      “The agent claimed that the only way he could contact the vendor was to go round and knock on the door.”
       
      Pathetic. Disingenuous. 
       
      That screenshot is still the same thing you see for a property that is ‘Sold STC’ if you try and book an appointment rather than phoning up with the number provided.
       

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      1. PeeBee

        cyberduck46

        Please feel free to make something “disingenious” out of this:

        I have just found a property on Rightmove that looks proper nice.  It’s “Sold Subject to Contract” – but that means nowt these days.  In fact I’ve heard rumours that some Agents actually make properties look “sold” for a bit so they can attract more interest when it becomed “unexpectedly re-advertised”.

        The write-up teases me with “This property must be viewed to fully appreciate what is on offer.”

        I reckon I could fancy a slice of that.  I’ll book a viewing.  Must be good – someone else is apparently already buying it.

        But when you go through the process on the brochure (the usual way to book a viewing with this Agent I gather, you are met with a pop-up box that simply states

        “Sorry – this property is now

        Sold (subject to contract)”

        But I’m invited to sign up so that “Dave” will keep me advised of any new properties that fit my bill.

        Help me here – what would the average person do given the above scenario?

        To you…
         

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        1. cyberduck46

          PeeBee,
           
          You’ve completely lost me.
           
          Are you saying that PurpleBricks are acting illegally or not?
           
          If so, what authority or law are you relying on?

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          1. PeeBee

            I didn’t mention any firm by name… did I?
            I didn’t say that anyone was acting illegally either.
            I asked you what the average person do given a scenario based upon a factual real-life set of circumstances.
            As I suspected – suggested, in fact – you have clearly tried to make something disingenuous out of it, instead of simply answering the darn question. 
            You say I’ve ‘lost’ you – but I reckon this’ll mean the readership will have found you out.

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            1. cyberduck46

              PeeBee,
               
              The article is about whether PurpleBricks allows for offers after the property is sold. I’ve posted additional information to the thread. Posters including Chris Wood (consultant to the BBC,  Tesco, Royla Bank of Scotland, & Standard & Poor) have been saying they are acting illegally. 
               
              I disagree. I suspect you do too but you don’t want to come out and say it.
               
              It’s a simple question.
               
              If you answer that and have any other ‘on topic’ questions for me I’ll gladly answer them as long as you explain clearly what you are asking. 

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  11. PeeBee

    Please have a look at this listing which, at the time of posting, was the ‘most recent’ on Zoopla:

    http://www.zoopla.co.uk/for-sale/details/42880143#h9wEkVb4tIj3xipk.97

    Note the statement

    “Click “brochure” to book A viewing today!”

    The minute that property goes ‘Under Offer’ – you will get that wonderful pop-up stating

    “Sorry – this property is now

    Sold (subject to contract)”

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    1. cyberduck46

      PeeBee,
       
      You realy are desperately clutching at straws 🙂
       
      I’m not even going to bother asking what law is being broken because it really is pathetic the lengths you are going to to try and find something. 
       
      Is there nothing beter for you to be doing with your time?

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